Sunday, January 17, 2016

President Obama lifts economic sanctions against Iran and gets Washington Post Journalist Jason Rezaian released as well as three other Americans held hostage in Iran....The relief from sanctions is per the Iran Nuclear Deal between Iran and six leading world powers that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu opposed as too lenient....The six leading world powers relative to the nuclear initiative are the United States, Russia, Britan, France, China and Germany....By www.clevelandurbannews.com Editor-in-Chief Kathy Wray Coleman



United States President Barack Obama (right) and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
Freed Washington Post Reporter Jason Razaian
By Kathy Wray Coleman, editor-in-chief, Cleveland Urban News.Com, and the Kathy Wray Coleman Online News Blog.com, Ohio's most read digital Black newspaper and newspaper blog. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. Kathy Wray Coleman is a community activist, educator and 23-year investigative, legal and political journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper in Cleveland, Ohio for 17 years. (www.clevelandurbannews.com) / (www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

KATHY WRAY COLEMAN INTERVIEWED NOW PRESIDENT OBAMA ONE-ON-ONE IN 2008
CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS READ ON BELOW FOR THE CURRENT ARTICLE ON THE LIFTING OF ECONOMIC SANCTIONS AGAINST IRAN
CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM-CLEVELAND, Ohio- Economic U.S. sanctions have been lifted in Iran per the Iran Nuclear Deal as Iran released four American hostages, namely Washington Post Journalist Jason Rezaian, Christian pastor Saeed Abedini, former marine Amir Hekmati, and Robert Levinson, who was missing the longest, and for  seven years. 


Razaian was held prisoner for 18 months. He was arrested in 2014 and subsequently convicted of spying. 

Charges against seven Iranians were dropped by the United States as a swap for the .
freedom of the four hostages.

President Barack Obama signed executive orders on Saturday to relieve Iran of the controversial sanctions, and after he received confirmation from U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that commitments made in July to reach nuclear accord had been met. 

The president said that compliance by Iran on the issue represents "a fundamental shift in circumstances with respect to Iran's nuclear program." 

Formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the international Nuclear Deal, which was reached in July between Iran and six leading world powers, including the United States, is one of the most comprehensive measures reached in several decades.

It follows a change in Iranian leadership since 2013 when Iranian President Hassan Rouhani ousted longtime president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Israel's Atomic Energy Commission, which advises the Israeli government, endorsed the deal, though Israel is not among the six leading world powers affiliated with the nuclear initiative, which in addition to the United States, include Britain, China, France, Russia, and Germany.  

Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who opposed the deal and asked U.S. Jews to support him on the matter, met at the White House last November, the first time the powerful pair had talked face-to-face in nearly a year. 

The  deal is designed to lift all crippling sanctions against Iran, and places a variable freeze on sensitive nuclear materials for at least a decade. It also prevents the middle eastern country from acquiring a nuclear weapon. 

The five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, led by the United States, hope the compromise will ultimately end a twelve-year crisis over Iran's suspicious nuclear work.

Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel since 2009, and who won reelection to the religious state last March, spoke to a joint session of Congress on March 3, 2015 and said then that the deal is too lenient, and lacks adequate safeguards.

Obama did not attend the speech, which was  arranged by then House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, who has since resigned from Congress.

At the time the president said the speech was "politically motivated."

Netanyahu denied then that his speech was hinged on political posturing, and said that he meant no disrespect of America's first Black president.