Saturday, March 7, 2015

President Obama to speak in Selma today at 4:00 pm to commentate the 50th anniversary of the voting rights march there across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed months later....By Cleveland Urban News.Com, Ohio's leader in Black digital news

President Barack Obama in March 2007 as a then junior senator from Chicago, Illinois during the annual anniversary of the 'Bloody Sunday' march in Selma, Alabama. Selma protesters were viciously attacked and beaten by police 50 years ago on March 7, 1965,  for attempting to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma in protest of  voting rights issues. Months later, in August 1965, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which is now under attack, say Obama, and Black Civil Rights leaders and some Democratic politicians from across the country. (Photo compliments of Getty Images).
By Kathy Wray Coleman, editor-in-chief, Cleveland Urban News.Com and The Kathy Wray Coleman Online News Blog.com, Ohio's leaders in Black digital news.  Coleman is a 22-year investigative journalist and political and legal reporter who trained for 17 years at the Call and Post Newspaper in Cleveland, Ohio. (www.clevelandurbannews.com) / (www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com)

SELMA, Alabama- Eight years after joining some 600 people as a then junior senator from Illinois, President Barack Obama, the first Black president of the United States of America, will again march across the Edmond Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, this time to commemorate the 50th anniversary of a Civil Rights march there for voting rights for Black people.

"Because they marched, I got the education I need," said Obama during a speech at an anniversary march in Selma in 2007, making reference to the 1965 'Bloody Sunday' march' in Selma. The president also said then that he became the first Black U.S. senator from Illinois because of such historical efforts like Selma.

Obama is set to speak today at 4:00 pm Eastern Standard Time with First Lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia by his side. 

A  march to commemorate 'Bloody Sunday,'  held annually in Selma, usually on the first Sunday in march, and as a symbolic measure because the initial march in 1965 was on a Sunday, is expected to draw thousands.

Already, thousands are in Selma , and a number of members of Congress, including U.S. Sens. Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman, 11th Congressional District Congresswoman,an Marcia L.Fudge, and U.S. Rep John Lewis, who marched with hundreds of protesters in Selma in 1965, will also join the president.

Former president George W. Bush will attend, among other dignitaries and Civil Rights advocates, including the Rev Jesse Jackson,  Andrew Young, and Martin Luther King III.

The police attack on marchers in Selma 50 years ago on Sunday, March 7, 1965 was prelude to two other marches within that five day period, both  led by the late Rev Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the last one of which thousands crossed the historic Edmond Pettus Bridge untouched.


Months later, in August 1965, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which is under attack today, from Republican led state legislatures across the country adopting laws to suppress the Black vote, to the U.S. Supreme Court striking down key provisions of the Voting Rights Act.

The Supreme Court, in 2013, struck down the provision of the Voting Rights Act that required Southern states to get federal court approval to adopt or substantively amend state voting rights laws.

Even the famous are upset over new policy trends relative to voting, including renowned R&B singer and songwriter John Legend, who said so two Sundays ago in accepting an Oscar along with hip hop artist Common for best original song for 'Glory,' which is on the soundtrack for the movie Selma. 

Selma was nominated for an Oscar in the category of best movie but lost to Birdman.

"We know that the voting rights they fought for 50 years ago are being compromised in this country today," said Legend during his acceptance speech, one that drew a standing ovation, as did his moving Oscar performance with Common earlier that night that brought some audience members to tears. 

As to the Cleveland Urban News.Com article relative to John Legend and the 2015 Oscars CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM,OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS 

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ONE-ON-ONE INTERVIEW WITH JOHN LEGEND BY CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS AND CLICK HERE TO READ THE ONE-ON-ONE INTERVIEW WITH JOHN LEGEND BY THE KATHY WRAY COLEMAN ONLINE NEWS BLOG.COM (www.clevelandurbannews.com) / (www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com)